• Help

    Duties

    Summary

    The U.S. Department of State maintains a rank-order list of eligible hires (a register) for appointments as career Foreign Service Officers (U.S. diplomats) based on the needs of the Department. Candi​dates who pass the assessment and clearance processes are placed on the register.  To learn more about applying to represent the United States abroad as a career Foreign Service Officer/U.S. Diplomat, please visit https://careers.state.gov.

    Learn more about this agency

    Responsibilities

    The U.S. Department of State is committed to creating a workforce that represents the diversity of America. It recognizes that all employees’ rich experiences, talents, and knowledge are unique and bring valuable input to every project, to every bilateral relationship, to every multilateral initiative.

    Our workforce is united by a common vision to promote and demonstrate democratic values and advance a free, peaceful, and prosperous world on behalf of America’s citizens. If you share that vision, we have a place for you as a Foreign Service Officer, otherwise known as a U.S. Diplomat. As a U.S. Diplomat – an Economic, Consular, Management, Political or Public Diplomacy Foreign Service Officer - you will be involved with work that matters, while expanding your worldview, and discovering countless opportunities for personal and professional growth.

    During this public service career, you can expect to be assigned to hardship posts. You may face an irregular or extended work schedule. These posts can be in remote locations, without many U.S. style amenities; there can be sporadic power outages and unreliable internet service. Health and sanitation standards can be below U.S. standards. Some assignments are “unaccompanied,” which means family members may not travel to the post with you.

    That’s why it takes a special type of person to represent America abroad, to advance diplomatic initiatives to the benefit of both the United States and the host country. Serving as a U.S. diplomat requires fortitude, flexibility, a commitment to public service, and the ability to adapt to changing situations and cultures other than your own. We recruit motivated individuals with sound judgment and leadership abilities who represent all 13 dimensions and can retain their composure in times of great stress — or even dire situations, like a military coup or a major environmental disaster.

    Whether you want to follow a professional path that grows your management skills, impacts economic policy or helps reunite families, you’ll find five different career tracks that can direct you towards realizing your goals. Please choose carefully, as your decision will have an impact on your selection and job experiences once you enter a Foreign Service career. In order to make the most informed decision, you’ll need to understand the similarities — and the differences — between each career track.

    You can take this quiz to assist in considering which track is right for you. After determining which career track is right for you can take the online FSO practice test that is designed to provide you with a realistic preview of computer-based FSOT and an estimate of your likelihood of passing.

    Travel Required

    76% or greater - After completing initial training in Washington, D.C., a Foreign Service Officer usually is assigned to two consecutive overseas tours, each two years in length. After the initial two tours, assignments will be for periods of one to three years overseas or in the U.S. The majority of a Foreign Service Officer career is generally spent serving at embassies or consulates abroad, sometimes accompanied by family and sometimes away from family and/or in difficult or isolated conditions.

    Supervisory status

    Yes

    Promotion Potential

    FE - CM

  • Job family (Series)

    0130 Foreign Affairs

This job originated on www.usajobs.gov. For the full announcement and to apply, visit www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/588645100. Only resumes submitted according to the instructions on the job announcement listed at www.usajobs.gov will be considered.